Matthew Law

T 416 849 9050 F 416 598 3730
E mlaw@lolg.ca
With clear analytical reasoning and exceptional problem-solving skills, Matt has proven himself to be an effective advocate for his clients. Clients also appreciate Matt’s calm and steady demeanour throughout the complex litigation process.

Matt’s practice focuses on corporate/commercial litigation, administrative law and general civil litigation. He often takes a leading role on files that involve injunctions, arbitrations and trials. Matt has argued numerous matters before courts and administrative tribunals, including summary judgment motions, injunctions and multi-day hearings. He also represents clients in private arbitrations involving complex legal issues and expert evidence and has developed extensive experience supervising forensic investigations.

Matt has written for several legal journals on topics related to the law of fraudulent preferences and recent appellate jurisprudence.  He also acts for pro bono clients in large and small matters, and has volunteered with the Law Help Ontario Duty Counsel project and Divisional Court Amicus program.

Community Involvement

  • University of Toronto Law School Mentor Program
  • Pro bono litigation matters
  • Law Help Ontario Duty Counsel project, volunteer
  • Divisional Court Amicus program, volunteer

Credentials

  • Called to the Ontario Bar, 2011
  • Clerkship: Justices Doherty, Laskin and Goudge of the Court of Appeal for Ontario
  • J.D., University of Toronto Faculty of Law, 2010
  • M.A. in Philosophy, University of Toronto, 2007
  • B.A. in Economics and Philosophy, University of Toronto, 2006
  • 2145850 Ontario Limited v. Student Transportation, 2012 ONSC 6865: In the first decision considering the scope of Section 22 of the Broader Public Sector Accountability Act, the Superior Court of Justice rejected an argument that the statute provided immunity to public sector organizations for breaches of the duty of fairness in procurement.  The court also ruled that a trial was necessary to determine the scope of the legislation and in particular to determine whether or not the legislation removed the common law remedies of interim and permanent injunctions for those who suffer harm as a result of unlawful or unfair procurement.  A trial date on behalf of a group of pupil transportation companies against various school boards has been set for June 2013.  The case and this decision have significant implications for Ontario’s public procurement process across all industries.  LOSL acts for pupil transportation companies across the province and has challenged the fairness and propriety of RFP processes undertaken by a number of school boards across the province.

  • University of Toronto Faculty of Law, top oralist award in the Corporate/Securities Moot
  • Harold G. Fox Scholar at the Inns of Court, London, England